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Owner Defends Club As Greensboro Moves To Shut It Down

7:23 PM, Jan 21, 2010   |    comments
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Greensboro, NC -- A Greensboro business owner said his club's bad reputation is a misunderstanding. Meanwhile, the city is taking legal action to shut down his club, which used to be known as "Lost Dimensions."

Attorneys filed a temporary restraining order Wednesday, which police said puts the club's management on notice that they will have to appear in court.

This comes after years of complaints and alleged crimes at the club on Farragut Street.

Owner Darryl McCarroll said he's taken steps during the last year to change the image of his club, and prevent crime. He changed the name of the nude dancing club and "juice bar" to "Nikitas Play Room." He also operates the "Bares Den" bar located in the same building.

"This is a very lengthy list," he said while looking over a list of calls to police about incidents at his property.

WEB EXTRA: See the list of calls during the last three years.

More than 100 calls were made to police during the last few years.

"One or two calls a month in a club this size, that's not terribly bad," McCarroll told WFMY News 2's Justin Quesinberry.

The city started the paperwork to shut the club down because of certain alleged crimes.

"Prostitution, drug offenses, crimes of violence, trespass, disturbances, breaches of the peace, homicides," said Cpt. Christopher Walker of the Greensboro Police Department.

McCarroll said many of the calls were made by club security about people nearby, who were not necessarily associated with the club.

"When we see something that's inappropriately happening, we call the police," he said.

Some might say the club draws inappropriate activity.

"That's one way of looking at it, but I would argue to say that's not the case," he said.

Police have wanted to start the nuisance abatement process on the property since at least 2007, but said they did not have enough evidence to make the case. Walker said there is no "magic number" in terms of how many crimes or complaints.

But now, after a seven-month long undercover investigation, city leaders are ready to move forward.

Walker said undercover officers found numerous reasons for nuisance abatement inside the club.

"The activity that they describe, I think, presented to a jury, they would find to be offensive and not the kind of thing you'd want in your backyard," he said.

But McCarroll said it couldn't have happened because the club is open with no where to have inappropriate activity happen. Private dance areas and even bathrooms don't have doors.

Also, customers and dancers must sign a disclaimer form agreeing there be no sex or illegal activities including the solicitation of prostitution or the sale of drugs.

But affidavits filed by the nine undercover officers tell a different story, Walker said.

"I encourage you to review the affidavits filed by the officers, some of which have been filed within 30 days, some of which may have been filed even less time than that," Walker said.

WFMY News 2 obtained copies of the public documents. Because of the graphic descriptions of alleged activity, WFMY News 2 is not putting the documents online.

In the last six months calls for police to McCarroll's club have decreased. During that time, he added security measures including screening and a limit on hanging out in the parking lot.

"It's not all about how many times the police respond. You and I can commit a crime and the police never know about it, but the crime still occured," Walker said.

"We've done everything that we can humanly do, except just die," McCarroll said.

The case will now go before a judge in about 10 days, Walker said. The judge will decide whether the nuisance abatement will be heard in a civil trial.

Walker said the nuisance abatement is a last resort for police. They don't want to have to close down any business," he said.

He said nuisance abatement against other businesses in Greensboro are possible if crime continues at those locations. He said it's been about a decade since the last nuisance abatement in the city.

WFMY News 2

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