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NC Politicians React To DOJ's Plans To Sue State Over Voter ID Law

11:56 AM, Sep 30, 2013   |    comments
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North Carolina politicians reacted to a report on Monday that the U.S. Justice Department plans to sue the state over voter ID requirements.

The DOJ alleges racial discrimination in North Carolina's voter ID law, which was passed this year.

Read: House Bill 589 NC Voter ID Law

The following politicians issued statements about the DOJ's decision (the list will be updated as more statements are available):

N.C. Governor Pat McCrory (R)

"I believe if showing a voter ID is good enough and fair enough for our own president in Illinois, then it's good enough for the people in North Carolina.

"I believe that North Carolina is in the mainstream on this issue and it's the Justice Department that's working in the fringes. This new law which I signed in August brings us in line with a majority of other states.

I'm very disappointed that the Justice Department has chosen to challenge a law that includes provisions such as voter ID as is used in other states throughout our great country. This lawsuit will only result in costly legal bills and drawn out legal battles for both state and federal taxpayers. Protecting the integrity of every vote is one of the most important duties I have as governor of this great state. And that is why I signed this common sense legislation into law."

U.S. Senator Kay Hagan (D-NC)

"Now is not the time to be putting up barriers to the right to vote, and I applaud the Justice Department's decision to challenge the new voter access restrictions in North Carolina that would, among other things, cut off a week of early voting and end same day registration," said Hagan. "We shouldn't be giving everyday North Carolinians fewer opportunities to make their voices heard while we are giving corporations more opportunities to influence elections. Restricting access to this basic right is simply not in sync with our North Carolina values, and it goes against our state's proud tradition of eliminating barriers to participation in the democratic process."

Senate President Pro Tempore Phil Berger (R-Rockingham) and House Speaker Thom Tillis (R-Mecklenburg) issued a joint statement 

"The Obama Justice Department's baseless claims about North Carolina's election reform law are nothing more than an obvious attempt to quash the will of the voters and hinder a hugely popular voter ID requirement. The law was designed to improve consistency, clarity and uniformity at the polls and it brings North Carolina's election system in line with a majority of other states. We are confident it protects the right of all voters, as required by the U.S. and North Carolina Constitutions."

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