Solar Eclipse Watch Parties Across The Piedmont Triad

Grab your solar eclipse glasses and get ready for a historic moment! 

Total Solar Eclipse Happening This Summer

Grab your solar eclipse glasses and get ready for a historic moment!

On Monday, August 21, the moon will pass between the earth and the sun for a total solar eclipse. There hasn’t been one to stretch across the entire country since 1918.

So, let’s bring on the solar eclipse watch parties! Here’s a list of watch parties happening across the Piedmont Triad.

If you’re having a solar eclipse what party that’s not listed, please send an email with details to news@wfmy.com

What: Join the WFMY News 2 at the Total Eclipse of the Park Eclipse Party!
When: Monday, August 21 from 10:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Where: Triad Park near the amphitheater
Details: Bring your own shoe box to make a pinhole project boxes with help from local Boy Scouts. Also bring a rock and paint eclipse rocks with the Greensboro Rock Painting group. There will also be food trucks and music from local radio stations. Plus, come out and meet the WFMY News 2 crew! 

What: Total Solar Eclipse Block Party
Where: High Point Public Library
When: Monday, August 21st from 1:30 p.m. to 3:30 p.m.
Details: The first 200 people to show up will receive a free pair of solar eclipse glasses to use. There will also be a DJ. This is a free event and open to the public.

High Point Public Library to Host Solar Eclipse Party

What: March For Science Greensboro Eclipse Watch Party
Where: LeBauer Park in downtown Greensboro
When: Monday, August 21 1:30 p.m.
Details: Enjoy live music and hands-on activities.

What: Kaleideum Solar Eclipse Party Fun
Where: Kaleideum North located at 400 West Hanes Mill Road in Winston-Salem
When: Monday, August 21 from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Details: The event features science demonstrations, crafts, special planetarium shows, and professional telescopes for safe sun-viewing. Plus, bring your own cereal box to make a solar eclipse viewer. The eclipse begins at 1:12 p.m. The event is from 11:00 a.m. – 4:00 p.m. Find out about prices and other details by visiting Kaleideum

What: Clock tower Viewing at Winston-Salem State University
Where: Between the clock tower and S.G. Atkins statue
When: Monday, August 21 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Details: Several telescopes will be accessible to view the eclipse. During the event, air temperatures will be recorded every 15 minutes for scientists to examine. Experts will be available to answer questions about the historic event. Special eclipse viewing glasses will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis.  

What: Clock tower Viewing at Winston-Salem State University
Where: Between the clock tower and S.G. Atkins statue
When: Monday, August 21 from 1 p.m. – 4 p.m.
Details: Several telescopes will be accessible to view the eclipse. During the event, air temperatures will be recorded every 15 minutes for scientists to examine. Experts will be available to answer questions about the historic event. Special eclipse viewing glasses will be provided on a first-come, first-served basis. 

What: Center for Design Innovation viewing party at Winston-Salem State University
When: Monday, August 21 from 1 to 3 p.m.
Details: Those attending will have the opportunity to view the NASA live stream broadcast in the CDI 3D cinematic visualization cube. Eclipse viewing glasses also will be available on a first-come, first-served basis. CDI is located at 450 Design Ave. in Winston-Salem. 

What: Boones Cave Park Solar Eclipse Gathering
When: Monday, August 21 from 12:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m.
Details: There will be free solar eclipse glasses and a 3-acre field for a perfect view. You’ll need to call to register and reserve your glasses. The number to call is 336-752-2322. Boones Cave Park is located at 3552 Boones Cave Road in Lexington. Make sure you bring a lawn chair! More details: Boones Cave Park 

What is a solar eclipse?

A solar eclipse occurs when the moon passes between the sun and the Earth at a particular angle. The moon blocks the light from the sun, casting a shadow on the Earth that, in the path of totality, turns day into twilight. It's only by coincidence that the moon is able to do this. The sun is 400 times wider than the moon, but it is also 400 times farther away, so they appear to be the same size in the sky.

Check It Out: 25 Burning Questions About Solar Eclipses, Answered

What will I see during a total solar eclipse?

During a total solar eclipse, as the disk of the moon blocks out the last sliver of light from the sun, the sun's outer atmosphere, the corona, becomes visible. The corona isn't an indistinct haze; sky watchers report seeing great jets and ribbons of light, twisting and curling out into the sky.

Science Behind The Total Solar Eclipse

Why is this called the "Great American Eclipse?"

This is the first total solar eclipse to only pass over the United States and no other nation since the country was founded.

Check It Out: How to Take the Best Solar Eclipse Photos


How To Snap The Best Pictures Of The Solar Eclipse

How "fast" is the eclipse?

The speed of the moon's shadow will average more than 1,600 mph, but it will actually slow down as it travels across the country because of the relationship between the earth's and moon's rotations and the planet's curvature. 

Check It Out: How fast is the solar eclipse? And 32 other questions, answered

Preview Of Solar Eclipse Moon Shadow Path Across US

How many people will be able to see the total eclipse?

An estimated 12 million people live within the path of totality, though many more are expected to travel to within the path. The number of people within one day's drive of the totality zone is around 200 million.

Check It Out: 10 best places to see this summer's solar eclipse


Solar Eclipse Stamp Is A First Of Its Kind!

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