'Be Mindful' | Social Media Posts Have Lasting Impact

The Lasting Impact Of A Social Media Post

GREENSBORO, N.C. – It’s proof that what you post on social media can land you in hot water: three students from three different schools no longer go there after they recently posted racial slurs online.

One was a Wake Forest University student. Representatives from the school reported the student admitted to calling her resident advisor the n-word. The school now says she's no longer enrolled- and condemned the offensive language.

Whether you like it or not - experts say your social media profile is a window to your soul.

“What's important for students to know is that your social media posts reflect your character. Any insensitive content, any content making fun of others, it's a reflection of you and your character,” said Laura Tierney, the founder of The Social Institute, based out of Durham.

They focus on teaching high standards for what you should - and should not - post. She says, no matter if it's a private or hidden account, you should assume there's a high chance it could become public.

It is important for kids to know that anything they click send on, think of social media like a microphone, she said, It's visible for anyone to see because of the power of a screenshot.

It's a similar warning from the UNC-Greensboro Director of Admissions, Christopher Keller, as they approach the deadline for college applications.

“I tell them to be very mindful of their social media, it is amazing what in this day and age, all the teenagers are on it,” he said, “But because they've grown up with it, they don't necessarily all recognize the permanence.”

Keller says they don't always scour through your social media posts and pages to find negative information. Sometimes, it helps them find out more about a potential student's likes and dislikes, and their scholarship qualifications.

“At the same time if we should see things that are racially insensitive remarks, bullying, harassment - that's a definite red flag,” he said.

Keller's rule of thumb? 'Would your 70-year-old grandma be okay with what she sees on your profile?' If so, he says it’s likely okay.

Copyright 2017 WFMY


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