CBS: Race An Issue For North Carolina Voters

GREENSBORO, N.C. -- The clock is ticking and the days are winding down.

In just 28 days, we will elect the next president of the United States. The latest NBC/ Wall Street Journal Poll shows Hillary Clinton leading Donald Trump by 14 points.

Both campaigns are hitting the campaign trail hard especially in North Carolina. High Point University's latest poll has Clinton leading Trump by 1 point.

Trump's running mate, Mike Pence was in Charlotte campaigning for him on Monday. 

President Obama was in Greensboro Tuesday, campaigning for Democrat Hillary Clinton. 

Since 1980, democrats have only won North Carolina once and that was in 2008 when President Obama was elected. It's a critical state divided over the issue of race.

CBS spoke with voters and some say racism is still an issue that's been getting worse over the last few years.

"Racism is still here," Vincent Johnson said. "I can feel it breathing down my neck."

The police shooting of a black man in Charlotte last month led to days of protests. Christopher Hines thinks Hillary Clinton is the presidential candidate who can help bring reforms.

"I think Clinton would be much better at making that change happen because she is for human beings," Hines said. 

Twenty-three percent of voters in North Carolina are black. 96 percent of them voted for President Obama four years ago. However, he still lost in North Carolina by 2 points.

Both Clinton and Donald Trump are courting black voters.

“You’re living in your poverty, your schools are no good, you have no jobs, 58 percent of your youth is unemployed — what the hell do you have to lose?” Trump said. 

Many people told CBS those comments are offensive. 

"He's indicating we're stupid. People of color, just look at this privileged white man. He will take you somewhere." Wanda Williamson said. 

Nathaniel Speight wants to know what American has to gain by electing Trump. But others like Bob Shue think Trump has a purpose.

" I think his purpose, is to get people in America thinking differently about what is happened in the past and make it better for the future."

Nancy Laxton said some people are too sensitive to what she calls Trump's honesty. 

"Everything he says they try to make it that he is trying to be prejudice or he is trying to make the American people think that he is against this person whether he is Mexican, Chinese, Japanese, whether they are whatever, and that is not what he is saying." Laxton said.

Bishop James Woodson disagrees. He told CBS racism is not dead.

 

 

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