Soldier Killed At Fort Bragg Was Training To Be Green Beret

32-year-old Staff Sergeant Alexander Dalida of Massachusetts died from his injuries.

FORT BRAGG, N.C. - A soldier killed in a demolition accident was training to become a Green Beret experienced in handling explosives.

Staff Sgt. Alexander Dalida of Dunstable, Massachusetts, died Thursday at Fort Bragg during training exercises involving demolitions.

Read: 1 soldier killed, 7 injured in Fort Bragg training exercise

Investigators haven't said whether an explosion caused his death, U.S. Army Special Operations Command Lt. Col. Robert Bockholt said Friday.

Seven other soldiers were injured. Bockholt said he did not know what their conditions were.

All of the soldiers were students from the John F. Kennedy Special Warfare Center and School, which is based at Fort Bragg, Army officials said.

Dalida, 32, was enrolled in an approximately yearlong course to become part of the U.S. Army Special Forces, also known as Green Berets. He was learning engineering skills as part of the course in which students are trained in occupational specialties. Special Forces engineers are specialists in demolitions, and also have skills necessary for building field fortifications and bridges, according to the Army's recruiting website.

His previous military training included working with MH-60 helicopters, airborne operations and learning how to survive while evading capture.

"Staff Sgt. Dalida's death is a reminder that a Soldier's job is inherently dangerous," Maj. Gen. Kurt Sonntag, the school's commander, said in a statement.

About 57,000 military personnel are attached to Fort Bragg, located next to Fayetteville, North Carolina. It is the largest Army installation by population and one of the largest in the world, covering about 161,000 acres.

The Special Operations Command has about 23,000 soldiers spread over several sites.

► Make it easy to keep up to date with more stories like this. Download the WFMY News 2 App now. 

Get more stories like this, like our Facebook page and follow us on Twitter

 

© 2017 Associated Press


JOIN THE CONVERSATION

To find out more about Facebook commenting please read the
Conversation Guidelines and FAQs

Leave a Comment