DACA Students Say They ‘Fear The Worst' As New Law Could Change Their Lives

DACA Discussions Continue In The Triad

GREENSBORO, N.C. - As President Trump works on a deal that could protect immigrants brought to the country as children, some of those people are speaking out.

“We knew this was going to come...and this is just the beginning. This is why I keep saying we've got the keep fighting,” said Jennifer Gonzalez Reyes, a Guilford College student.

Read: Trump's crackdown on 'sanctuary cities' blocked nationwide

While talks continue at the White House, four college students in Greensboro are sharing their stories.

They all called Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals, or DACA, a blessing, especially for their education, and hopes for the future.

All the students on the panel today were brought to the United States by their parents illegally when they were kids. They say DACA paved the way for them to get driver's licenses - and on the right track to go to college.

Last week, President Trump announced the program will end in 6 months. The program protects these immigrants from deportation. Even though the President and Democratic leaders are working on a compromise, these Dreamers are skeptical. Fernando Jimenez says ending DACA is a step in the wrong direction.

“I was devastated you know. We want to give young people the opportunity to move forward, we are not here to steal your jobs, we are here to contribute to help our communities,” he said.

The students say they fear for the worst - losing the only life they know in the U.S. The President said he supports dreamers, but a new law to replace DACA will come with strings attached.

“No deal has been final reached on this - he supports making an agreement on DACA but that would have to include massive border security,” said Sarah Huckabee Sanders on Friday.

Reyes is anticipating the worst - but hoping for the best.

“I'm not afraid anymore. Because if anything, I've imagined the worst scenarios that could happen and it's not that bad. It's bad in the sense that I could probably end up leaving this country,” she said.

The White House Press secretary says a clearer plan on the future of DACA should come in the next 7 to 10 days.

Copyright 2017 WFMY


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