26 2 LINKEDINCOMMENTMORE

DURHAM, N.C. – A Triangle man recently spoke with CBS-affiliate WRAL about witnessing Mount Everest's deadliest day.

Shane Jones camped less than a mile away from where falling ice and rocks killed 16 Sherpas in April.

"We knew pretty quickly it wasn't going to be good," he said. "It was pretty gruesome just to see the bodies being brought down one after another and stacked up near our camp."

Surviving Sherpas refused to lead tours on the mountain, which ended the climbing season.

"When that many people die it's just too much right there in front of you. I didn't feel like I could continue, and I don't think I could go back and do it again," Jones said.

Jones was unable to finish his trip. He returned to North Carolina last week, but wasn't scheduled to return home until June.

Read or Share this story: http://www.wfmynews2.com/story/news/features/2014/05/11/shane-jones-mount-everest/8975655/