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CLAY,NY -- After Lindsay Hunter of Clay gave birth to the baby boy she's always dreamed of, she heard the news that's every mother's nightmare.

Baby has an early diagnosis of ALD thanks to a new law in New York. CBS News

"You don't know what's going to happen. You don't know how long you have. But all you can do is hope and listen to all of the good stories people tell you," says Hunter.

At two-weeks-old, Matthew was diagnosed with a deadly rare genetic disease called ALD. The brain disorder destroys myelin, the protective covering that surrounds the brain's neurons -- which allow us to think and control our muscles. The most devastating form of ALD appears in childhood, generally between the ages of four and ten. It starts off with learning disabilities, behaviorial issues and vision loss and only gets worse from there.

"Usually once the signs have started you can't stop it. You can't slow it down. It's just going to be a long ride until they end up in a vegetative state and pass away," says father Nicholas Hunter.

The Hunters know about Matthew's diagnosis thanks to a new law in New York state called Aidan's Law that makes it mandatory to test for ALD in the newborn screening. New York is the only state in the country that makes it mandatory. Since it took effect in January, Matthew is the fourth baby to test positive.

"He has a chance because we know because he can be monitored for the rest of his life," says Hunter.

Matthew will have brain MRIs every six months to monitor the disease.

"Honestly knowing about it, I rather know about it early than too late. You can make sure everyday he lives life to the fullest and he doesn't hold back on anything," says Hunter.

As his parents pray for a miracle and treat every healthy day as a blessing.

that makes it mandatory to test for ALD in the newborn screening. New York is the only state in the country that makes it mandatory. Since it took effect in January, Matthew is the fourth baby to test positive.

"He has a chance because we know because he can be monitored for the rest of his life," says Hunter.

Matthew will have brain MRIs every six months to monitor the disease.

"Honestly knowing about it, I rather know about it early than too late. You can make sure everyday he lives life to the fullest and he doesn't hold back on anything," says Hunter.

As his parents pray for a miracle and treat every healthy day as a blessing.

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