Restaurants, bars, and hotels do exceptionally well after the storm caused massive outages.

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GREENSBORO, N.C. — Restaurants, bars, and hotels do exceptionally well after the storm caused massive outages.

Did you want a dinner reservation on Saturday? How about a night at a Greensboro hotel? Good luck.

Packed. Booked. Sold out. All full.

With thousands of power outages across the Triad area, folks were more eager than usual to eat out. Others needed warmth and shelter.

Ham's in downtown Greensboro was jam packed. On top of the outages, the Duke, Carolina rematch brought in fans desperate to watch the game.

" I couldn't believe actually the turnout we had, the patio was packed, even though it was a little cool outside, people still come and hung out," said David Pedigo, the General Manager of Ham's Downtown.

People trying to get into Ham's likely couldn't get in right away, For more than two hours on Saturday, they had a line.

Hotels were booked all over the Triad. The Proximity General Manager, Tony Villier said the phone started ringing Friday morning and didn't stop all weekend.

"I think we had about fifty percent of our occupancy for that night was at least do to people with the power outage," said Villier.

The Proximity offered more than $100 off rooms on Friday and Saturday for guests impacted by the massive power outages. Normally rates are around $259. They charged $149 in the wake of the storm. Both nights, the hotel sold out.

The next business boost for hotels comes from the ACC Tournament. However, that's not a good thing for people without power.

Hotels are already booked for ACC tournament guests, not allowing power crews a place to stay. DH Griffin Wrecking Company is offering an alternative. Along with Blue Ridge Companies and Triad Commercial Properties, DH Griffin is offering a large warehouse facility to serve as a shelter for crews.

For the next week, the facility will be transformed into a makeshift hotel complete with cots and portable showers. They expect anywhere from 400 to 800 workers.

"If these guys went away, we could be weeks without getting power back so with our help and all their hard work, from a safety standpoint of what they do, we'll hopefully have everybody's power back on as soon as possible," said David Griffin, President of DH Griffin.

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