Storm Damage: County By County

A line of strong thunderstorms moved across the Piedmont Triad last leaving a trail of damage and destruction in Rockingham County, especially the Eden area.

Cars Smashed by Trees on Stratford Road

GREENSBORO — A line of strong thunderstorms moved across the Piedmont Triad last leaving a trail of damage and destruction in Rockingham County, especially the Eden area.

 

ALERTS: Latest WFMY News 2 Weather Alerts

As of 6 a.m., Guilford County had around 3,900 power outages according to Duke Energy's power outage map. Rockingham County had just over 1,100.

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School Delays

  • Rockingham County Schools are closed Friday with the option to close if needed.
  • In Guilford County, Northern Guilford High, Northern Guilford Middle, Northern Guilford Elementary and McNair Elementary are on a two-hour delay. Guilford County Schools says employees should plan to arrive two hours later than normal.

The storms could even bring large hail. These storms could also produce a brief isolated tornado depending on the severity.

Here's a look at storm damage by county:

Rockingham County

  • Numerous trees down across Eden, N.C. Damage to houses also reported as the storm moved through.
  • Possible reports of damage around Van Buren Road.
  • Adams Street, Meadow Road, Ray Street, Aiken Road and Summit Road are experiencing road closures.
  • Rockingham County Schools are on a 2-hour delay Friday morning with the option to close.

Guilford County

  • Reports of a tree down on a home at Landis and Jackson School Roads in Browns Summit
  • Tree down on Eugene and W. Friendly Avenue
  • Tree down across Wendover and Holden Roads 
  • Two trees down on Elm Street near East Cone Blvd. in Greensboro

Davidson County

  • Tree down blocking one lane at NC49/109

Randolph County

  • Trees down on Mechanic Road, Granville Road, and Loflin Road
  • Tree reported on a home on Kindley Road

Forsyth County

  • 5800 block of Pine Hall Road in Walkertown is shut down

Alamance County 

  • Tree down on Durham Street Extension 

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Reporting Power Outages

Duke Energy: 1-800-POWERON, 1-800-769-3766 Customers may also report an outage or view current outages online
Duke Energy Progress: 1-800-419-6356
NC Electrical Cooperatives: 1-888-411-7870
Energy United: 1-800-386-4833
Randolph Electric: 1-877-736-2633
Piedmont Electric: 1-800-449-2667
Surry-Yadkin Electric: 336-356-8241
City of Lexington Electric: 336-248-2337
City of High Point Electric: 336-883-3111

Tornado Safety Tips

Read: Tornado Safety Tips: What You Need To Know To Be As Safe As Possible

The WFMY News 2 weather team is tracking the storm as it closes in on the Triad. Storms are expected to continue through the morning hours. The heavy rain potential will quickly move out of the area early Friday morning.

Read: Severe Weather Safety Guide

Lightning kills! According, to the National Weather Service, lightning kills an average of 55-60, people in the U.S. every year, and hundreds more are severely injured. More than 400 people are struck by lighting every year.

ReadWhat You Need To Know About Lightning That Could Save Your Life

TORNADO SAFETY TIPS
From the National Weather Service

The safest place to be is an underground shelter, basement, or safe room.
If no underground shelter or safe room is available, a small, windowless interior room or hallway on the lowest level of a sturdy building is the safest alternative.
Mobile homes are not safe during tornadoes. Abandon mobile homes and go to the nearest sturdy building or shelter immediately.
If you are caught outdoors, seek shelter in a basement, shelter or sturdy building. If you cannot quickly walk to a shelter: Immediately get into a vehicle, buckle your seat belt and try to drive to the closest sturdy shelter.
If flying debris occurs while you are driving, pull over and park. Now you have the following options as a last resort: Stay in your vehicle with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible.
If you can safely get noticeably lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car, and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands.
Your choice should be driven by your specific circumstances
House/Stand-alone building:

Get to the lowest level possible
Go to an area with as many walls between you as possible
Get in a bathtub or interior closet

Mobile Home:

Get out of the mobile home and get in a sturdy building if possible
Get out of the mobile home and hunker in a ditch
If no ditch or building is nearby, plan ahead and get to a sturdy building ahead of time
Apartment:

Get to the lowest level (go to a neighbor's apartment on the first floor)
Regardless of what floor you're on, get in a bathtub or interior closet
If you are on a higher level and can't get to a lower apartment, hunker down in the breezeway of the apartment building
 

Car:

If possible, pull over, park, get inside a building and out of the storm
If you have to stay in your car, try to find a ditch to park in and use your emergency break
DO NOT park under a bridge or overpass
Miscellaneous Tips for Keeping Safe in a Tornado:

Cover yourself with a mattress, sleeping bags, or pillows
Wear a helmet to protect your head
Hunker down as much as possible
Read: Watch vs Warning: What's the Difference In Severe Weather

TORNADO FACT OR FICTION SAFETY

From the National Weather Service

FICTION: Lakes, rivers, and mountains protect areas from tornadoes.

FACT: No geographic location is safe from tornadoes. A tornado near Yellowstone National Park left a path of destruction up and down a 10,000 foot mountain.

FICTION: A tornado causes buildings to “explode” as the tornado passes overhead.

FACT: Violent winds and debris slamming into buildings cause the most structural damage.

FICTION: Open windows before a tornado approaches to equalize pressure and minimize damage.

FACT: Virtually all buildings leak. Leave the windows closed. Take shelter immediately. An underground shelter, basement or safe room are the safest places. If none of those options are available, go to a windowless interior room or hallway.

FICTION: Highway overpasses provide safe shelter from tornadoes.

FACT: The area under a highway overpass is very dangerous in a tornado. If you are in a vehicle, you should immediately seek shelter in a sturdy building. As a last resort, you can either: stay in the car with the seat belt on. Put your head down below the windows, covering with your hands and a blanket if possible, OR if you can safely get noticeably lower than the level of the roadway, exit your car and lie in that area, covering your head with your hands. Your choice should be driven by your specific circumstances.

FICTION: It is safe to take shelter in the bathroom, hallway, or closet of a mobile home.

FACT: Mobile homes are not safe during tornadoes! Abandon your mobile home to seek shelter in a sturdy building immediately. If you live in a mobile home, ensure you have a plan in place that identifies the closest sturdy buildings.

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