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Could we soon get a COVID vaccine that is a pill? What about a drug to treat COVID?

Both are in the works and at least one could be available by the end of the year.

GREENSBORO, N.C. —
Right now the only way to get the COVID-19 vaccine is to take your shot.
But just recently, a viewer asked, ‘Is it possible to get the vaccine another way that doesn't involve a needle?’.

We talked to the Cone Health Medical Director of the Children’s Unit at Moses Cone.

“That would be great and one day that might happen. There's even talk about a nasal spray. It's not on the near horizon but in the future,” said Dr. Suresh Nagappan.

There's hope that one day a pill could replace the needle. An oral vaccine is now being developed and tested at a research institute near Los Angeles.

"To have a vaccine that's room temperature, that could be a pill is life-changing,” said Dr. Tara Seery, Clinical Trial Physician.

And Pfizer is working on an anti-viral therapy for the coronavirus. Instead of a vaccine, it's a medication that could be prescribed a the first sign of infection.

The drug would act like other protease inhibitors-- which slows down the production of enzymes needed for the virus to multiply. This is similar to how drugs used to treat HIV and Hepatitis C work.

DON'T FALL FOR A VACCINE SCAM

“Some person on social media is texting you or someone is offering you to buy a vaccine, it's a scam. If you're on an online pharmacy and they're offering you a vaccine to buy it's a scam. If someone offers to buy a vaccine through bitcoin, it's a scam. Basically, do not buy a vaccine online,” said Yoav Keren, Brandshield Founder & CEO.

Just in case you missed it, you should never buy a vaccine. It's a scam.
The vaccine is free. Signing up for the vaccine is free. If anyone asks you for money or personal info like banking or social security number, it's fake.

My email box has been flooded with fake emails claiming to be from Pfizer. The emails claim they’re interested in research or a survey. Our tech expert says this is how scammers are trying to get into business computer systems.

“They are directed at people at companies. The hope is someone clicks something and they can get information or put malware on devices and infiltrate the systems,” said Keren.

Scammers have all day to dream up the next new way to get your information and eventually your money. Don't let them win.