We've talked about families spending more time together because of social distancing. And as much as this can be a great thing, for some kids, it is a harder adjustment. Being separated from their friends because schools are closed is difficult. Some kids might start to withdraw and stay in their rooms. Separating from their families and staying in their rooms can be a way to cope with the stress. For teens, it's part of their developmental process to separate themselves from their parents. It's not so typical for elementary age kids. Compare the time that they're spending in their rooms now vs before the social distancing and closed schools because of the coronavirus pandemic. 

Here are a few ideas to help you entice your kids to get out of their rooms. Keep in mind that kids especially teens don't respond well to lectures or demands. Instead, try to make the other parts of your home enticing. Open blinds and drapes. Allow natural sunlight in your home. Play music in the background. You might have a puzzle or board game out on a table. You never know if your teen might put together a part of the puzzle. Or, bake cookies or another favorite treat so the aroma speaks to their bellies. Or, get involved in something that they're doing. Just don't overstay your welcome. 

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When your kids come out of their rooms, you might be tempted to quip something like, "Finally" or "it's about time." Not words your kids will respond kindly to. Instead, keep the conversation light. You can ask for help with something they'd enjoy doing. You want to reinforce the behavior that you want, which is to get out of their rooms.

If you have a question, you can find me on my Facebook page: Blanca Cobb-Body Language Expert. Write a message on my timeline and I'll get back to you. I'd appreciate if you give my page a "like."