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More than 900,000 Hanesbrands Customer Info. Hacked

Hanesbrands says hackers accessed the information of more than 900,000 online and telephone customers.
Online database

WINSTON-SALEM, NC -- Another data breach, this time tied to a company in the triad.

Hanesbrands says hackers accessed the information of more than 900,000 online and telephone customers.

The hackers were able to access customers' names, addresses, phone numbers and the last four digits of their credit cards through an order database.

The company says the suspects tricked its software system and accessed the customer information for about a two-week period in late June and early July.

Spokesman Matt Hall told WFMY News 2, the information the hack exposed "does not pose a credible risk to customers."

Corporal Ryan Todd with the Greensboro Police Department's Financial Fraud Squad says that's largely true if the hackers did not access more information.

"[It] leaves very little opportunity for financial card theft and financial card fraud, he added.

Corporal Todd says that's because it only takes a phone book or a Google search to get that information.

But what it does open up, is the opportunity for schemes and scams.

"Once they have your telephone number, once they have your name, once they have the last four digits of your credit card, they may call you saying "hi, I'm with a certain company, and you missed a payment or you owe us money. We have the last four digits of your card" -- so it seems a bit more convincing," he explained.

And once they make contact, it's easy to convince you to give more important information or send money.

A scheme in which, Todd says, none of us are immune.

"It isn't entirely preventable to my knowledge," he said.

Hanesbrands says the database has been fixed by cyber-security experts.

In an email message, Hall adds, "the retail industry common practice of using the last four digits for credit cards in order for consumers to identify how they paid for purchases will be stopped."